Another article in a series intended to briefly explain how to apply different agile practices to work in social purpose organizations, today’s topic is: The Agile Workspace

Agility requires that we create an environment that is conducive to fruitful interaction. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a value delivery team is face-to-face conversation. Team effectiveness increases as barriers to communication decrease.

An agile workspace is anti-cubicle farm. It provides a mixture of collaborative, social, and private space. The collaborative space at the hub of activity is the “team room”. The ideal team room can be easily reconfigured based on the team’s needs. Team members face each other, usually at tables in the center of the room. Walls are used for posting notes, displaying charts, graphs, and the results of brainstorms. There should also be space for writing or drawing, such as a white board or chalk board, so that team members can creatively express and capture their ideas and progress. Social space in an agile work environment should include things to make the team members comfortable, such as a kitchen with snacks and a good coffee machine. Finally, it is helpful to have a nearby room for private conversations or to allow team members to “check out” if they need to focus or clear their head.

The folks at Sustainability Studio in Toronto have a beautiful agile workspace. The architects used modular walls that can be reconfigured as needs change. There is also a ton of natural light and the freedom to open a window for some fresh air. Take a look at the pictures. Just throw some sticky notes on the wall, and you would have what I’m talking about.

One question that inevitably arises is “what do we do if we can’t get everyone together?” Remember that learning is the means by which you achieve agility and deliver value to your stakeholders.  It is okay to accommodate distributed team members as long as you do your best to adhere to the principles of collaboration and consciously learn from the process.  For instance, if you usually have a weekly team meeting by phone, try getting a webcam and do a video Skype chat instead. This way the distributed team members of your team can have that extra visual connection. After trying this tool, reflect on its use and see what you learned from the experience. If you find something that works well, don’t change a thing. And if something didn’t work, try something different.

For more reading on agile workspaces, and plenty of pictures to inspire you, I recommend:

MIT School of Architecture + Planning The Agile Workplace: Transforming Work and the Workplace

The Ideal Agile Workspace | Mike Cohn’s Blog – Succeeding With Agile

The “Best Agile Work Space” Contest | Analytical-Mind

Would you like help becoming more agile?

If you would like help transforming your space to an Agile Workspace, or assistance with adopting any other agile practice, please post a comment on the blog. I am certified to provide OpenAgile training, coaching, and consulting, and I would be happy to aid your enterprise to realize the full benefits of being agile.

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